What’s it to ya?

Sign that says the right way to hang toilet paper is over the roll

A friend of mine shared a story at work the other day about a family gathering she was at. Her nephew was getting ready to go outside and had his left boot on his right foot and his right boot on his left foot. His grandfather pointed it out, suggesting the kid may want to change. The kid replied, “What’s it to ya?”.

The grandfather thought about it for a moment, realized he didn’t care, and said, “Nothing. Fill your boots.”

We all laughed, and started talking about things that drive you crazy if they’re not done “the proper way”.

For instance, we agreed the proper way to hang toilet paper is with the paper on the outside, not the inside, and yet some misguided people still hang it the wrong way!

Somebody else said they hate it when people cut toast because toast shouldn’t be cut. Who knew there was toast etiquette?

When you load the dishwasher, do you put the cutlery in facing up or down?

I remember when I was a teenager making grilled cheese with a friend. She told me I was doing it wrong (in my family, we always made cheesie melts in the oven instead of toasting them in a frying pan).

My best friend Leslie still tries to convince me to this day to make bacon in the broiler instead of on the stovetop because she says it’s easier to clean up and tastes better.

This week’s #HappyAct is to remember one phrase the next time someone tries to get you to change something that, in the end, doesn’t affect them one iota. What’s it to ya?

 

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It ain’t a beauty contest no more

Lush cosmetics

After 26 and a half years of marriage (but who’s counting), as Dave likes to say, “It ain’t a beauty contest no more”.

And yet, after a wickedly long winter, there’s a little part of all of us that wants to rejuvenate and renew ourselves.

Thanks to a new brand of cosmetics, there’s now a relatively expensive way to pamper yourself.

Lush Fresh Handmade Cosmetics is a line of cosmetics and creams that uses all natural ingredients made fresh. They are opposed to testing products on animals and use no preservatives and have minimal packaging.

My girls discovered Lush a few years ago. I never really tried their products until recently, when Clare brought home a bagful of creams and masks from a friend’s birthday party.

Yesterday I used their Cup ‘o Coffee Face and Body Mask. Within minutes, five months of winter washed away in the shower, leaving my skin soft, glowing and supple.

I felt like a new woman afterwards. Maybe not new enough to win a beauty contest, but I never did do well in the talent and swimsuit competitions anyway.

This week’s #HappyAct is to pamper yourself a little this week. Ed. note: After store hours, Lush offers private beauty nights, great for birthday parties, bachelorette parties or just a girl’s night out.

The most important man in your life

My mechanic

I’ve been keeping a little secret from my husband: he’s not the most important man in my life.

The most important man in my life likes things fast, is good with his hands and is a man of few words.

His name is Jeremy Tinline, and he is the head mechanic and owner of Vic’s Auto in Kingston.

When it comes to your mechanic, you want someone you can rely on, who will see you at a moment’s notice, who will take care of your every need and make you feel safe.

Jeremy and his team at Vic’s Auto do just that. Whenever I’ve had an issue with my car, they take me right away, often will give me a loaner for the day, and always make sure I’m back on the road in no time.

As a small business owner, Jeremy is usually in the shop early in the morning, and can still be there working after 5 when I come in to pick up my car at the end of the day. He is a man of few words, but of much action and integrity.

The day I asked Jeremy if I could take this picture of the two of us, he first looked surprised, then grinned, checked his hair, and posed for several selfies. I got the impression people don’t thank him enough for doing the great job he does every day.

This week’s #HappyAct in honour of Valentine’s Day, is to show your mechanic or a person in your life who helps keep you safe or lightens your load some love.

Don’t miss next week’s blog post for Vaentine’s Day: Ten lessons on love and relationships from The Batchelor.

Me and my mechanic

Seven life hacks for cabin fever

Girl sleeping with dog
Don’t fight the urge to hibernate, embrace it and a big warm fluffy puppy

This past week, in its infinite wisdom, the Limestone District School Board declared four “snow days”, cancelling all buses to the elementary and high schools. I use “snow days” in parenthesis, because for those of you who live in Eastern Ontario well know, there was no snow on Monday and Tuesday, just bright brilliant sunshine. They cancelled school because (insert whiny wimpy voice here), “it was too cold”.

With a snowstorm the prior weekend, what ensued was six days of raging cabin fever for kids across the county and anxiety for the poor high school students whose exam schedules were being bounced around like juggling balls at a summer’s busker festival. By Thursday, kids were begging their parents to drive them to school.

Hopefully the school board has learned its lesson and is reviewing its policies on bussing, but in the meantime, here are some tried and true hacks for combating cabin fever during inclement weather.

  1. Need exercise? Have a dance-off and bust-a-move.
  2. Fix it up. Tackle that home reno or clean up project you’ve been putting off forever. You’ll thank yourself when the weather is sunny and warm and it’s already done.
  3. Take a nap. Our bodies are meant to hibernate in winter. If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em and luxuriate in a long winter’s nap.
  4. Discover the artist in you. We rarely make time to try a new craft or hobby. Maybe you are a budding Picasso or Rembrandt and just don’t know it. Pick up a brush and try your hand at something new.
  5. Fight boredom with board games. Risk, Monopoly, and my personal favourite Stock Ticker are great ways to kill an afternoon.
  6. Go outside and play in the snow. During one of the “we have to cancel school because it’s too cold outside” days, Clare played outside for three hours and made this cool snow fort. Go for little walks and let the fresh air revive your spirits.
  7. Don’t watch TV endlessly. It’s OK to indulge in a movie or Netflix binge-watching, but at some point boredom will inevitably settle in.

This week’s #HappyAct is to make a plan for that next snow day…they are calling for snow on Tuesday, but maybe even Monday will be too cold to send the kids to school. #TriboardTuesday

Snow fort
The snow fort Clare made when she played outside for three hours on one of the days the school board said it was too cold to send kids to school

A country mile

country fieldOne of the many things I’m thankful for is living in the country. While I grew up in the suburbs of Toronto, I’m forever grateful we made the decision more than 20 years ago to get out of the city and move to rural roads where the air is fresh, the mosaic fields of fall spread before you like a harvest feast, and you can walk or drive for a country mile without seeing another car or person.

What I didn’t count on was how much the simplistic charm of the little hamlets and crossroads, and the people who inhabit them would grow on me.

For instance, I was driving to Tamworth the other night for a 4H meeting. The sign at the church in Croyden said, “Rhonda. Sunday. 6:30.”

It made me wonder who was Rhonda and what was she doing at the Croyden church on Sunday at 6:30? Was she getting married? Or was it an unhappy occasion—a memorial service for Rhonda? Was she young or old?

I did wonder if perhaps my friend Rhonda Nontell who has a cottage nearby was giving a gospel performance at 6:30 in Croyden, but then the sign would say “Rhonda. Sunday. 6:30. $5.” I mean most of us would pay at least $5 to see that performance.

These are the things that keep me up at night.

And then there is the country wave. When I first moved to this area 20 years ago, my best friend’s Mom Audrey educated me on the country wave. The country wave is different if you’re walking or driving.

When walking, the proper way to wave to people is a slight nod of the head or raise of the hand for a half-wave. No full-out wave, or Queen wave, just an acknowledgement you saw them driving by.

If driving, there are two approved country waves. There’s the two finger wave, where you just raise two fingers off the steering wheel or the four finger wave with your four index fingers extended. A slight nod of the head is acceptable.

Over the years, I’ve experienced everything from discovering a newborn fawn at the end of my driveway, to eating my breakfast cereal with an escaped cow staring at me through the kitchen window, to chickens on our hot tub. Yes, country living is definitely better by a country mile.

This week’s #HappyAct is to give thanks for where you live. Here are some pictures I took on my drive and walk on the country roads near Tamworth the other night.

horses

country sign
This is the first sign I’ve seen for turtles and snakes

barn silosunset over a field

Bring back Happy Days TV

Does anyone else wonder what happened to happy TV? Everything on TV is so dark these days.

Clare is a huge Archie comics fans, so when she heard they created a TV show based on the comic series, she was excited to start watching it on Netflix. I thought it might be fun to see how Archie, Jughead, Veronica, Betty and the gang were portrayed on the small screen, so I watched the first few episodes of Riverdale with her.

It became clear in the first ten minutes this was NOT the Archie comics I grew up with. Moose shot by a rogue serial killer, Veronica ordering hits on her ex-boyfriend, characters cruising the woods after dark looking for a potential hook up. WTF?!?

I miss the days of happy TV. The days of Friends, Seinfeld, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, and yes, Happy Days, when teenagers were teenagers who hung out in soda shops or coffee shops, and when the biggest drama was who you were going to ask to prom.

We were telling Clare the other night about Fantasy Island, where people flew in (who can forget Tattoo yelling, “ze plane, ze plane”) each week to live out their fantasies and The Love Boat, where Julie, Isaac and the crew helped people find love by the end of each episode. Call me nostalgic, but I miss those shows.

When did shows like NCIS, Dexter, Breaking Bad, and The Walking Dead take over the airwaves? The next generation of dark TV is even darker, shows like 13 Reasons Why, Stranger Things and Riverdale, ridden with themes like suicide, murder and blackmail.

No wonder teenage mental health is in crisis. TV used to be a place where we could escape the harshness of the world; today angst, anxiety and negativity washes over us from the airwaves.

This week’s #HappyAct is to boycott dark TV. Let’s all call on Netflix and HBO and the networks to bring back happy days TV, shows with positive messages and themes. Clare last week said she’s had enough of Riverdale. Let’s follow her lead.

Take me out to the ball game

baseball stadium

Special guest post by Mark Gauthier

The weather is easing up and I’ve seen a few robins out in the backyard which is a sign of good things to come. Some people smell that earthy dog smell that’s uncovered after the snow washes down the gutters but I smell Rawlings, peanuts and beer.

Baseball.

The word’s been around for almost 150 years and yet it’s become the Hamlet of our sports culture with phrases like,

“Bottom of the ninth, bases loaded and a full count” or this beauty, “Gettin’ to first base”.

We all know these sayings and I bet you can walk down King St. and the majority of people would know exactly what you’re talking about.

It’s a beautiful game. Not only what happens on the field but off the field.

There’s the scoreboard–every statistic tells a story from an RBI to a stolen base, you can pick up exactly what happened at what time throughout the game. No other game can tell a story like baseball.

Off the the field there’s the chatter. Every fan has a tale to tell on what brought them to the game. Don’t believe me? When the Chicago Cubs won the World Series after a 108 year drought, it affected so many people’s lives and not just because of the drought being over, it was the fans that were affected. Generations who never saw them win a championship were remembered at grave sites, arm patches and photographs. That’s what baseball does to a nation, or the Chicago Cubs.

This field, this game — it’s a part of our past, Ray. It reminds us of all that once was good, and it could be again.
—Terrance Mann, Field of Dreams.

Even with the digitization of America, there’s something about the game that peels back the skins of time and reveals its heartbeat, our childhood, our innocence and our love of all that was good in its most simplistic form. It’s in the sounds of the game from the pop of the bat to that heckler in the stands the best and the worst of who we are. It’s in the smells of the turf, the beer and the hotdogs. Seeing the score board and reading the game and one of my favourites, the taste. Hot roasted peanuts and hot dogs. Baseball makes a lot of sense.

This #HappyAct is a little project that will take you into the summer, and hopefully if the stars align, the autumn.

Go see a baseball game. There’s many to choose from The Blue Jays, The Chiefs or the Ottawa Champions. If you’re feeling ambitious, take a trip and make a pilgrimage to Cooperstown or one of baseball’s greatest parks. Go by yourself or best yet, bring the family.

For more Cubs action, visit Mark’s blog, canuckcubbie.com.